Monthly Archives: May 2012

The National Recording Registry, KC Edition: Part 3

Bookmark and Share

To mark the release of this year’s additions to the National Recording Registry, we’re going to feature registry recordings with ties to Kansas City.

The National Recording Registry at the Library of Congress honors and preserves recordings of significant cultural, musical and historical value. The registry contains 17 recordings that has ties to Kansas City.

Part 1 contains recordings added in 2002-2004.

Part 2 contains recordings added in 2005-2007.

Mary Lou Williams

2008
Night Life, Mary Lou Williams. Kansas City’s jazz scene featured two exceptional female pianists: Julia Lee and Mary Lou Williams. At the time of this recording in 1930, Williams was the pianist, composer and arranger for Andy Kirk and His Clouds of Joy, the top band in KC and the midwest. This astonishing recording is further notable by the fact that she was only 20 years old.

Continue reading

Advertisements

The National Recording Registry, KC Edition: Part 2

Bookmark and Share

To mark the release of this year’s additions to the National Recording Registry, we’re going to feature registry recordings with ties to Kansas City.

The National Recording Registry at the Library of Congress honors and preserves recordings of significant cultural, musical and historical value. The registry contains 17 recordings that has ties to Kansas City.

Part 1 contains recordings added in 2002-2004.

2005
One O’Clock Jump, Count Basie and His Orchestra. Basie’s signature recording was released in 1937 and features some of the best musicians ever to have come from Kansas City, including Lester Young on tenor sax and Buck Clayton on trumpet.

Record producer Dave Dexter Jr., who grew up in Kansas City.

Continue reading

The National Recording Registry: KC Edition, Part 1

Bookmark and Share

To mark the release of this year’s additions to the National Recording Registry, we’re going to feature registry recordings with ties to Kansas City.

The National Recording Registry at the Library of Congress honors and preserves recordings of significant cultural, musical and historical value. The registry contains 17 recordings that has ties to Kansas City.

Continue reading

Historic KC Recordings: “What’d I Say” and “Respect”

Bookmark and Share

To mark the release of this year’s additions to the National Recording Registry, we’re going to feature registry recordings with ties to Kansas City.

Producer Jerry Wexler attended what is now Kansas State University and regularly drove to Kansas City to hear jazz.

Producer Jerry Wexler is the Kansas City connection to these historic recordings. Wexler is the legendary producer at Atlantic Records who worked with Ray Charles, Aretha Franklin, the Allman Brothers and Led Zeppelin.

Continue reading

Historic KC Recordings: “One O’Clock Jump” and “In the Mood”

Bookmark and Share

To mark the release of this year’s additions to the National Recording Registry, we’re going to feature registry recordings with ties to Kansas City.

Count Basie

One O’Clock Jump
Added to the registry in 2005, One O’Clock Jump by Count Basie and His Orchestra is perhaps the best example of Kansas City-style jazz. It’s a riff-based song that features a “head” arrangement that the musicians learned by ear, rather than one that’s written down.

Although developed and recorded in New York, One O’Clock Jump is pure Kansas City and features some of best players to ever come from here, including Lester Young on tenor sax, Buck Clayton on trumpet and Walter Page on the double-bass.

Continue reading

Stan Kenton Recording Added to National Registry

Although this is news is not directly tied to the Kansas City area, it’s worth noting that a recording by Stan Kenton, the Wichita-born bandleader, has been added to the National Recording Registry at the Library of Congress.

The library announced today that Artistry in Rhythm by Stan Kenton and His Orchestra was one of 25 historic recordings to preserved for its cultural, artistic and historic merit.

According to the library, Kenton composed Artistry in Rhythm in 1941. Because of a musician’s union-imposed recording ban stemming from a dispute over royalties, it was not recorded until 1943.

This live performance was recorded in London in 1971.

Today in KC’s Music History: “Single White Female” Released

Bookmark and Share

Country singer Chely Wright’s fourth album, Single White Female, was released on May 18, 1999.

Single White Female is Wright’s best-selling album, and the title track was her first and only No. 1 single on the country charts.

Continue reading

Eagles Receive Honorary Doctorates

Bookmark and Share

The Eagles, along with Allison Krauss (center) and Mulatu Astatke (left of Krauss), received honorary doctorates from the Berklee College of Music. Eagles guitarist Joe Walsh (far left) was born in Wichita.

The Eagles received honorary doctorates on this past weekend from the Berklee College of Music in Boston.

The current Eagles lineup of Glenn Fry, Don Henley, Timothy B. Schmidt and Wichita-born Joe Walsh were recognized for their achievements in contemporary music, for their enduring contributions to popular culture, and for the influence their careers and music have had over Berklee’s international student body.

At its commencement exercises, Berklee also conferred honorary doctorates to bluegrass musician Alison Krauss and Ethiopian musician Mulatu Astatke.

The Eagles have begun a late spring/summer U.S. tour. Walsh’s first solo album in 20 years, Analog Man, will be released June 5, and he has solo dates scheduled for August.

KC-Area Resident Inducted into Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

Niki Sullivan (far left) was the rhythm guitarist for the Crickets, Buddy Holly’s backup band. After retiring from the music business, Sullivan relocated to the Kansas City area, where he lived until he died in 2004.

The late Niki Sullivan, the original rhythm guitarist in Buddy Holly’s backup band the Crickets, was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in mid-April.

The Crickets were inducted with several legendary backing bands, all of whom were excluded when their stars were inducted.

Continue reading

Joyce DiDonato Voted into Gramophone Hall of Fame

Bookmark and Share

Joyce DiDonato, the Grammy-winning mezzo-soprano, was recently voted into Gramophone magazine’s Hall of Fame.

As part of the British magazine’s 90th anniversary celebration, the Hall of Fame honors artists, producers, engineers and record executives, as voted for by Gramophone’s readers and visitors to its website.

Continue reading